Cavalry (Sedley)

Cavalry members standing with their horses.

The American cavalry was there to support the British and French, but the cavalry unit was less useful during World War I due to the advances in technology. The Cavalry unit mainly were involved in helping with transporting messages and materials, helping locating the enemy and strategizing, and finally any police duties involved with the military. Some cavalry units were dissolved and created into field artillery units. Having a cavalry unit was a major advantage in some ways compared to being on foot. This would reduce the amount of casualties due to the speed of being on a horse compared to being on foot. America only had one cavalry unit which was the 2nd U.S. Cavalry Regiment. The cavalry unit had a huge impact on the defensive of the strategies used. The U.S. Cavalry Unit was the only unit that received two firearms. After the attack, they decided on the regulations for the 2nd U.S. Cavalry Unit which included: Each troop would have six automatic rifles, they would have enough horses to carry the firearms, and fifty men in the troops would be given grenades. The 2nd Cavalry Unit had 14 officers and 302 troopers. The Cavalry, being the only one in the U.S. had unique roles and were given opportunities that were unique only to the cavalry.

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7 thoughts on “Cavalry (Sedley)

  1. okinne88

    This post on the Cavalry in WWI was excellent. It really gives an insight into how technology was evolving so fast that useful tactics were not being used anymore, such as cavalry. My question would be, was the cavalry units able to be offensive tools, or were they only defensive? This post was really detailed and left little questions unanswered about cavalry in WWI. The picture is a great depiction of how difficult it must have been to coordinate with these horses to get them to certain locations.

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  2. dylanchase62400

    This post is incredible. The detail and media included provide in depth detail without letting the post get too lengthy. The last think anyone wants to read in a blog is a book, so I praise you for that. I think adding a piece on how cavalry still remains in the woodwork of life today. Overall great post but there is certainly room for this to be an incredible first post

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  3. Rory Tettemer

    Here comes the Cavalry!! This is a very interesting blog post and picture that I knew little about. I was shocked to hear that the soldiers in the cavalry were given limited supplies, but when thinking about how much money the US had going into this war, it does make sense. I feel like a strong quote in this blog would assist in improving the flow of this post.

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  4. Chase M

    I think this is a great topic that probably has not been researched by many in the past. It would be cool if there was a way to find out if any members of the calvary are from the Suffield area, so that you could connect it to things around us. Overall, this is a great topic.

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  5. bensylvester8

    This post was very interesting, and is something that can turn into a really unique and fantastic essay. I love how your family is attached to the calvary, and it will give you a different perspective to write from. This looks really good, the one thing i might suggest is discovering how the calvary affected the war.

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  6. freemmyles

    I enjoyed the post and liked the accompanying picture in the post. Maybe add a picture of the regiment if you can find it. Also you have a repeated sentence midway through your post. Overall good, but needs more actual sited facts.

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  7. burch2016

    I think this was a great post and I think that you did a really good job of telling how the cavalry was involved. Was the cavalry specific to the United States or did other countries have one as well? I think that you could improve the post by finding out if anyone from Suffield served in the cavalry.

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