Liberty For Sale

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The Liberty Cannon with the Liberty Bond House in the background.

The United States sold Liberty Bonds to raise money for the war time efforts. They still sell them to this day. “A Liberty bond (or liberty loan) was a war bond that was sold in the United States to support the allied cause in World War I. The general consensus was that subscribing to the bonds became a symbol of patriotic duty in the United States and introduced the idea of financial securities to many citizens for the first time. At one point in time, Waterbury had sold the most liberty bonds in the United States. This fact is made more impressive with the fact that Waterbury had only about 73,000 residents. According to an article published in the Hartford Courant in 1918, slogans for liberty bonds were advertised on automobiles. If seen on an automobile, that person was most likely a member of the Waterbury Rotary Club. The Rotary Club was a big deal in Waterbury as well. They were formed a year before the war started and really kind of found their footing during the war running Liberty Loan campaigns and running Red Cross campaigns.

The Rotary Club had a Liberty Bond house, which still stands today where they would hold rallies where thousands of people would show up and buy the bonds. Waterbury actually received a cannon as a prize for being one of the top Liberty Bonds sellers in the country.

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7 thoughts on “Liberty For Sale

  1. dylanchase62400

    This is an excellent topic. There is great detail here and it is all backed up with evidence. Is there any further information on the rotary club and its history? I think that any additional information would add to this post, that already has so much interest.

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  2. Rory Tettemer

    Wow, what an informative article on Liberty Loans! I had no idea how important they really were during WWI. Great use of a quote in the beginning of the blog; this really helped grab my attention and made curious to learn more.A little more description about the Liberty Bond house would really make for a great conclusion to this blog.

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  3. okinne88

    I think this post does a great job in giving a lot of background details of how liberty bonds were used. However, I question why would someone buy a liberty bond? Does it offer any benefits to the buyer? This post is very detailed and does a great job giving examples of liberty bond usage, but a quick addition of why people might buy these could clear up an confusion. I also found that picture to be excellent as well as its importance to WWI.

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  4. Chase M

    I enjoyed the topic that you chose on Liberty Bonds. A suggestion I would have is to go into more detail what it meant to have a Liberty Bond and what kind of benefits someone who owned one would receive, if any. I think this could illustrate why some people decided to buy them while others did not.

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  5. sedleyb1617

    This post gave a lot of background information which helps when you read it to fully comprehend the topic. I also think that it was helpful to supply specific statistics in Waterbury. As Dylan said, is there anymore information on the Rotary Club?

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  6. bensylvester8

    This was very informative and very interesting. This is something you can really dive into and it is something very unique for this war. My only suggestion is to find out more about Waterbury and maybe other connecticut towns like this one.

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  7. freemmyles

    I enjoyed how in depth this post was. I wanted to know for how long did Bridgeport produce these weapons after the war was over? Maybe one more picture should be added between the text somewhere just to break up the large chunks of writing.

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