Propaganda in Connecticut during WWI

WWI Propaganda is best animated in posters used to influence civilians to help the war effort. The propaganda influenced all different races and both genders with the goal of funding the entire war effort. Propaganda also targeted certain states within the United States. One state that they targeted was Connecticut. Connecticut is a rather small state, but it held a strong value. Connecticut became one of the lead producers of weapons and materials for the military. Connecticut was a major asset in the victory of the allies during WWI, and it helped continue throughout WWII as well. Connecticut propaganda was specific and it targeted middle class people, woman, and the youth (specifically young adults from 18-22 years of age). The way Connecticut held its propaganda was very strategic and became beneficial throughout the war.

Women becoming more empowered and important to war effort.

I want to explore first how Connecticut targeted woman to join the WWI war efforts. The strategic minds of the military specifically got woman to work roles that were typical to a role of a man, in order to supply the troops and have the ability to send over more troops from the United States. The propaganda used to lure woman into the workforce was very well thought out and intricate. The propaganda writers wanted to appeal to woman and make them feel equal and important. This proved to be effective and became a major asset in funding the war efforts.

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8 thoughts on “Propaganda in Connecticut during WWI

  1. okinne88

    This post about propaganda is very interesting. The idea of women in war is something that has been being argued about for many years. My question is were the women really seen as equal or were they treated poorly when they entered the war effort? Overall this post brings up a topic that is still relevant today and is something that everyone can learn a lot from. This iconic picture is a great one to use because it was the beginning of the movement for women rights.

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    1. dylanchase62400

      This post is incredible. It’s provides an excellent introduction complete with the classic propaganda poster. It then ends with a question for the reader to think about and interpret with others. I think that this post could get even better with one adjustment. If there was another question to go along with the one you ask, it would also provide you with discussion topics in your upcoming posts. Great job

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  2. Rory Tettemer

    I love looking at historical propaganda in wars and the picture that you chose really intrigued me. I loved how you described how propaganda was utilized to not only recruit, but to fund the artillery needed for war; usually an overlooked aspect of WWI. It would be very interesting if you described who was in your picture [Rosie the Riveter] because many do not know that this girl was the face of the woman’s rights movement during this time.

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  3. sedleyb1617

    This post was detailed in explaining the background of propaganda and also stayed on topic with describing how Connecticut influenced propaganda in WWI. I like that you explained where you wanted to go with this topic as you further research it. You could possibly talk about what drew America to using propaganda specifically in Connecticut.

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  4. Chase M

    This is a very interesting post about the propaganda of WWI. I think it would be interesting to find out where exactly these posters were put up in the different towns. This could show some insight of what type of people they were trying to recruit to the war.

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  5. freemmyles

    I liked how you directed your attention towards the way it effected the female population. Maybe a different pic for German propaganda.

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  6. burch2016

    I think that this is a really good topic that we have not delved into yet. Are there any posters that are specific towards targeting Connecticut or are they all mainstream? I think that you could add a few more images.

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  7. bsullivan35

    This is an iconic image. It is often one of the top of many lists of great war propaganda posters. That said, the date of create is from 1942: http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_538122 I think there is a case to be made that the posters of WWII were heavily influenced by the posters made during WWI. I also think we should follow up on Chase’s question concerning where the posters were actually plastered. Were they in local government areas? Town Hall? The train station? Good work everyone!

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