Category Archives: 1774 Freedom & Slavery 3rd HOT Log

Dr. Warren: The Untold Hero Among the Sons of Liberty

I am currently enrolled in a Project Base Learning class. We are learning about what happened in Suffield, Connecticut, during 1774, specifically regarding the topics of freedom and slavery. We created a blog to share what we learned about our town’s history. My first topic was The Boston Tea Party. My role in the group was to find the essential background information, including where and when the event occurred and most importantly, why this is special about this event. When I dug deeper in that topic, I found that Sons of Liberty had a huge role in this events. So my second HOT Log was about the Sons of Liberty. Now, I have researched about

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Joseph Warren

Joseph Warren or Dr. Warren was an American who played a huge role in early American history. He also organizes the early American Patriot in the American Revolution War. He also had a mission to do after the Boston Massacre. Warren was told in 1775 to deliver for the second time the annual speech recognition the Boston Massacre. He also one of the famous midnight ride during the American Revolution war. On April 18, 1775, Warren know that British troops were prepared to cross the Charles River and go the Lexington to arrest John Hancock and Samuel Adams.  Dr. Warren was dead during the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17,1775, while other While Other Sons of Liberty members such as John Hancock, Samuel Adams and John Adams summon in Philadelphia as agent to the Continental Congress. Dr. Warren was very important not only because he turned the war around but he also a very bravery man who help other Sons of Liberty

 

 

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Oliver Wolcott

Oliver Wolcott was born in November 20, 1726 at Windsor, CT. Oliver was 17 years old when he enrolled at Yale College and he study medicine. Apparently, Oliver was meant to be in politics. he was elected as a member of the council of Connecticut in 1774. He took an active role in debating the independence of the Colonies and he was a signer who sing Declaration of Independence

 

Once I dug deeper in the roles of Sons of Liberty, I found out that The Sons of Liberty party a huge organization. Joseph Warren was an American Patriot leader and Oliver Wolcott was a Governor in Connecticut during 1796 to 1797. I will try to research more about Oliver Wolcott because he is a Sons of Liberty although I did not find a lot of information about him. Although he has a huge impact on American. I had use the research skill to find information about Joseph Warren and Oliver Wolcott. Now, I have to use the I have to use maturity and network to tweet other historian or the library where they have a solid information.

 

Source:

1 https://www.constitutionfacts.com/us-declaration-of-independence/sons-of-liberty/

2 http://historyofmassachusetts.org/the-sons-of-liberty-who-were-they-and-what-did-they-do/

3 http://causeofliberty.blogspot.com/2011/03/oliver-wolcott.html

4 http://causeofliberty.blogspot.com/2011/03/oliver-wolcott.html

The Other Leg of the Triangle Trade

Our project base learning class is investigating freedom slavery in Suffield Connecticut during the pivotal year of 1774. In this project my goal is to investigate deeper the slave movement of the Caribbean as well as Suffield trading relationship to the Caribbean. This topic is very broad but I am focusing on the reason of slavery throughout the Caribbean, mostly my home island, and relate it back to Suffield, Connecticut if possible. Though my research so far and looking at fellow classmates and their findings, I can correlate some of the information I have found with theirs. For example, Harry is looking into a dock in Suffield, Connecticut where cargo was transported to the Caribbean.

An estimated 12 million Africans were transported across the Atlantic to the Western Hemisphere from 1450 to 1850. Brazil and the Caribbean had the largest number of imports and for the longest period of time, until the 1880s.

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The Other Leg of the Triangular Trade, from Complicity

Most people know about the triangular trade, but some don’t know about the food, livestock, lumber route from Connecticut to the Caribbean. In return for, sugar, molasses, coin, and bills of exchange from the Caribbean.

So far for my research, I visited different websites and learned more about the famine in the Bahamas during the Revolutionary War. Because the British blockaded trade from Connecticut to the Caribbean slave plantations. The information I have found helped me further understand this other leg of the triangular trade. This has also introduced me to new and interesting leads for my topic. For example, I am now interested in the postwar Loyalist migration during 1785. It was interesting during this research to learn where slaves and migrants left southern colonies after the Revolutionary War and migrated to the Bahamas and other Caribbean island. Along with researching this topic on the internet, I visited the Pompey Museum in The Bahamas, where I found out that the building was where they used to auction off slaves; however, I could not get any information if they had any documents relating to the other leg of the triangular trade–any documents on cargo or trading evidence with Connecticut or other New England colonies.

 

 

Complicity: Complicity: How the North Promoted, Prolonged, and Profited from Slavery: Anne Farrow, Joel Lang, Jenifer Frank: 9780345467836: Amazon.com: Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Mar. 2017.

“Slavery in the Caribbean – Caribbean History.” Slavery in the Caribbean – Caribbean History. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

Sources: “Washington State University.” Fall 2014 The Effects of Slavery on the Caribbean Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

“African Slave Trade, 1788.” African Slave Trade, 1788. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

 

 

 

 

Did Richard Fortune Earn his Freedom in the War?

While Titus Kent is an African-American Revolutionary War veteran recognized on Suffield Veterans Memorial, a classmate discovered that a Richard Fortune fought in the Connecticut Regiment, and he is listed as being from Suffield. This discovery made me reflect on my previous research where I read Katherine Harris’ introduction in African American Connecticut Explored, where she opens the collection of history with this reflection: “The coexistence of freedom and slavery shape the lives of people of African descent from their first arrival in the Connecticut colony.” I then read David O White’s work, Revolutionary War Service; Path to Freedom in the collection and began more research on Richard Fortune.

We were able to get more in depth about what an important Katherine Harris’ research was. Looking into her researching history about slavery and freedom in Suffield Connecticut, I was able to come across Richard Fortune. Just like Titus Kent, who has
been researched by one of my classmates was an important

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Researched on Ancestry.com

Richard Fortune was pa
rt of the Revolutionary War and entered into the army at the age of around 18. In the 1820’s there are records of the United States Federal Census. This record informs us that Richard Fortune had to be the age of 45 and up in the year 1820. It also gave us information on his spouse. His wife was Diana Fortune who was able to live longer than him and she received his pension benefits when she was his widow. There is also a record of
her age in the year 1820. It says she was in between 26 and 44 years of age. This is a broad range, but it gives us the idea that she was fairly younger than Mr.

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Researching on Ancestry.com

Fortune.
As a class we were hoping to get more background information if possible on Richard Fortune. Researching Titus Kent gave us a good deal of information on Connecticut Slavery and Freedom during 1774. Thus, so finding more information on another African American soldier would get us closer to answers we are looking for as a class. If we could find more information on Richard Fortune, that could be great for my class. Can anyone help us with more sources and resources to find out more about Richard Fortune’s life after the war?

The Search for the Brig Mercury

 

In class we have hit a roadblock, we have been tasked with finding more information on our topics as a whole. This means trying to find more and more about the men we already know so little about. However, we came up with new ways to source our information, by calling upon other historians and library’s. With the search for the Brig Mercury still going on I had run into a rut, I was not sure where to find more information. That’s when I found that the Clemet’s library in Michigan had info on the ship. I began to reach out to them by email showing them my previous Hotlog. This way when they received my email they were able to see what I was researching. They responded promptly with ways we can access their documents on the Brig Mercury. Hopefully with these documents I will be able to dive deeper in to the ties that the Brig Mercury was connected to Suffield men. So far we know that the brig mercury had run for at least 10 years. There is proof of the ship working from the late 70s and late 80s, however we are still unsure how many people worked upon the ship, if they had slaves, and how big of a ship she was. What we do know is that traders from Suffield would ship goods to and from the carrabiean, Thaddeus Leavitt being one of those men.

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Ancestery.com

However in a recent finding I was able to find that the brig mercury was Owned by Nathaniel Howard, Andrew Hilyer, Josiah Bissel and Thaddeus Leavitt. These men were known as the biggest traders within Suffield. However, this also helped me find information on how Squire Loomis, another Suffield trader, traded his goods. I was able to identify that Squire Loomis would unload and sell his goods right below the town of Suffield. This lead us to believed that he sold his goods near the Enfield Suffield Boarder. Squire Loomis was known as the “Suffield Merchant” within the East India Trade, making frequent trips to the Caribbean. this was mostly able to be done using Genaolgy.com as well as Ancestery.com. these sources have proven to be reliable and link up quite well with my other findings.

Works Cited
“Pg15rremington.html.” Pg15rremington.html. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.
-https://tinyurl.com/zrqr8rz
“Squire Graves Loomis, Sr.” Geni_family_tree. N.p., 08 Dec. 2014. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.
-https://tinyurl.com/zsa647e

Preaching the Aboliton of Slavery

I have continued my research into the impact of religion on slavery and freedom in Connecticut in 1774. The connection between the two topics is particularly interesting to me because of the potential impact religion could have had on the institution of slavery. Some religious leaders did indeed speak out about the institution and were active in trying to abolish it, while others did not. From what I understand about Reverend Levi Hart of Preston, Connecticut, he was one who spoke out against slavery, he advocated for better living situations and lives for slaves. While Timothy Dwight IV, the president of Yale, initially was said to not agree with slavery but eventually bought a slave named Naomi. Although he did claim it was his intention to “buy her freedom” we are unsure as to if this ever happened.

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Jonathan Edwards Sermon

A new name I have come across is theologian Jonathan Edwards of Connecticut who was born in 1745. He supposedly recycled Anthony Bezenet’s golden rule. Bezenet was a Quaker delegate from Philadelphia also born in 1745 and his golden rule was “whatever you wish that men would do to you, do so to them”. Bezenet taught African American school children at a school he set up called the African Free School in Philidelphia. He advocated for full equality for black and white people and acknowledged as a white male that he was not interested in having superiority. He came up with many philosophical arguments countering the institution. Jonathan Edwards also looked to the Revolutionary War natural rights arguments to justify his thoughts on why slavery should be abolished. Edwards even gave sermons preaching his thoughts, one titled “The Injustice and Impolicy of the Slave-Trade and the Slavery Of Africans”, in 1791 to an anti-slavery group in New Haven Connecticut. I am currently searching for more information on this sermon as well as this group and am starting by looking for a copy or a typed version of the sermon.

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Log book of slaves Africa to New London

Through my current research on Jonathan Edwards, I was able to find awesome recourses that has a list of prints created in Connecticut in the 1700’s regarding slavery that I am hoping to continue to look into. For example, I found the log book of slave trades from New London to Africa as well as a story of a specific slave we have yet to search named James Mars. I am excited to further my knowledge on all of these issues, and I think I have come across some excellent finds through the UMASS Amherst library and the library of Congress. The religious impact on slavery was seemingly impressive. It turns out that quite a few religious leaders did not agree with the institution and through the search of one influential, comes the names of many others in our area.

http://libguides.southernct.edu/lincoln

https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african-american-odyssey/abolition.html

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trr106.html

http://princeamongslaves.org/module/abolitionism.html?page=2

http://woolmancentral.com/files/J_Kershner_Woolman_Lecture_2015.pdf

https://www.harrietbeecherstowecenter.org/stowedocuments/Slavery_in_New_England.pdf

https://books.google.com/books?id=gnFYUkVujAwC&pg=PA244&lpg=PA244&dq=secondary+sources+about+jonathan+edwards+ct+theology&source=bl&ots=wVPhWMoC_I&sig=RcGCZcprvKT_3CzB5V6o2r9XUkA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi71N3XlqnSAhXr24MKHXAvB8AQ6AEILTAE#v=onepage&q=secondary%20sources%20about%20jonathan%20edwards%20ct%20theology&f=false