Category Archives: Learning Through Failure

Celebrating Our Failure

We were pleased with our community presentation and recently tried to share what we learned about our original research on Wikipedia. Through great effort and the long process of researching our key figures in our investigation, we finally pulled together our material and drafted our Wikipedia page for John Hooker. Other small groups in class are working to publish a page on Henry Foster and Daniel Hemenway. However, the John Hooker page, which was ready first, was declined after being reviewed by an Wikipedia examiner. Click here to see the process unfold: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draft:John_Hooker Therefore, we are now working to refine our work and use this roadblock as a learning experience. 

The reason it was declined was that the examiner suggested to use more reliable sources that are independent of the subject. The important part of our source should be: verifiable with clear evidence, not only clue and suggestions of why the subject is notable and inclusion in an encyclopedia.

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This screenshot was taken on May 9th. Return to the site for more updates:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draft:John_Hooker

While we feel “stuck” at this point since the sources we linked to our content are reliable and some are primary sources, we will revaluate our work and try to add more connections. We will also dialogue with the with the experienced editors in Wikipedia. We still feel that John Hooker is a worthy topic for Wikipedia due to his contributions to the abolition and women’s rights movements in Connecticut. On top of that, we have visited the Harriet Beecher Stowe center and saw the letters he has written during these movements. We learned that he kept his own personal notebook, which he titled, “Anti-Slavery.” Our next step is to connect again with the Harriet Beecher Stowe center for more suggestions on how to enlarge this Wikipedia page for John Hooker as they have some of his personal letters in their archives and know about his other contributions to Hartford as well as Farmington, Connecticut.