Category Archives: Project-Based Learning Assessment

Slides For Community Presentation

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Great #PBL Step: PQP Protocol for Peer Review

peerreviewOne of the most essential parts of building a productive atmosphere for learning in any classroom is sharing what you learn. Another is giving and receiving useful feedback. The most important thing is to do this in a positive spirit. With that in mind, we must give feedback on each other’s work in a useful and kind way (remember the class motto?). So, moving forward, please be an active agent in creating a more positive and productive learning environment.

We’ll follow these these PQP steps when we comment on each other’s blog posts. To start, let’s have everyone make at least one sentence for praising the post, one sentence for poising a question about the post, and one sentence for suggesting how to polish the ideas in the overall post (which include text and complementing media). Feel free to write more than this amount. Also be mindful that a good blog post has media the complements the prose and the proper categories and tags are selected (and “uncategorized” is de-selected). Most importantly, compose your comments in Standard English. Stay positive!

Some links for more learning on the topic: http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/peer-review-narrative-122.html

What’s a HOT Log? A Great #PBL Assessment

Higher.order.thinkingSimply stated, a HOT Log (Higher Order Thinking Log [log = systematic record, journal]) explains what you have learned, what you want to learn next, and what skill(s) you will apply for your discovery. Because we will categorize each HOT Log on the blog, we will be able to access anyone’s discovery when we begin to sythesize our information before our final presentation. Teachers can have students create HOT Logs ritualistically (every 7 ro 10 days) or perhaps when the student discovers an interesting collection of sources, primary or secondary.

Another way to describe this Project Based Learning writing assignment is to think of this task as an intellectual reflection on your next step towards our goal of finding more information about members of the Connecticut 20th Regiment. You should explain what skill you will use to learn this next topic or research step.

In 500 words, make a claim about the necessity to explore one, specific resource (article, book, periodical, web site, historical society, historian (even better if we can Skype him/her}, historical library [I am a member of The Connecticut Historical Society), movie, technology or other research tool, learning lens, such as Place Based Learning, etc). Your short paper will evaluate the potential importance of this source for our investigation as well as building upon our research story.

In terms of skills, click here (http://www.pinterest.com/bill0353/ } to reflect on the possible skills you will need for your next steps.

Be sure to include an informative and pithy (concise and forcefully expressive) title and embed complementing media (video if possible, clear and interesting image, audio link, etc).

Citation standard. Let’s have a list of sources at the bottom. You can type “source:” with a colon after it. Then create a hyperlink to your actual source. If it is a book, create an interesting link associated with that book. You can be creative as long as the reader knows exactly what source you used. If it is an image, let’s type “photo credit” and then paste a hyperlink for the image.

A range: lucid, logical, sequential, includes a valuable source or resource. Well-written following rules of Standard English. 500 word range achieved in a concise and fluent manner. You also articulate well the skill you will require for your next intellectual step.

B range: there is a missing ingredient or prose contains issues of Standard English. Overall logic or sequence of ideas may need to be addressed.

C range: Length and other significant issues.

Caribbean Slave Movement

 

lg_ms2_bahamasstamp                      I wanted to explore the Suffield history society, as they cover many different sides of slavery and why they came to , in general, Connecticut. I wanted to find out what was the reason slaves landed in Connecticut, who sent them, why were they sent, and what did they do once they got here. This source gives me a lot of information and I have to read through to find what I want. This is troubling, however, the lack of organization of the source does not allow me to find my answer efficiently. It is necessary that I explore this site to dig out as much as I can. Through this site I was able to find different facts about slavery in Connecticut, and the site is composed of five different sources, Rootsweb.com where there is a detailed and organized list of, towns, names, and number of slaves, Slavenorth.com has a lot of information about the reason slaves landed in Connecticut and the times and date in which they arrived. History.rays-place.com is a similar site to Slave north where it gives you a lot of information, however this site focused more on the time and dates rather than the reason they came to Connecticut. Conneticuthistory.org focused on a single slave and everything she went through starting from where she was born to where she died. Lastly, the Connecticut magazine talks more about numbers, and the reasons they were brought over to Connecticut. Small ideas from all these sites where taken and added to the Suffield history society website, this gives me an advantage because I can see that there are more than one authors perspectives of slavery in Connecticut situation. I visited these sources to make sure they were credible and they prove to be. The information was taken out of these five sources was information specifically regarding slavery in Connecticut. The Suffield history society wrote this article in 2003 by Douglas Harper, who is a historian, author, lecture and journalist. He began researching Northern slavery around the year 2000 during the course of general Civil War research. Quickly reading through this site has a lot of detailed information, including dates, names, and towns. According to the Suffield history society, on the eve of revolution Connecticut as a whole had the largest number of slaves in New England (6,464). Families in Hartford, New Haven, and Norwich were said to only had owned one or two slaves during this time. Later on, come to find out, most ministers, lawyers, and public officials owned slaves. Early in the 1700s the direct import of slaves to Connecticut where considered to be too few to be worth the trouble of taxing. The Connecticut citizens did not directly participate in the slave trade. Through my research I find that there is a lot of opinions about the reason to why and how slaves ended up in Connecticut, Suffield History Society is written by a certified author and has a background of history when it comes to slavery and them being in Connecticut. Not only did I makes sure the site was credible I made sure the author was too so that I know that I am getting the most accurate information possible.  Viewing the slave motion from the Caribbean would bring the presentations together so that there are different views of the trade. Though there was not a large slave movement in Bahamas there were ships carrying slaves stopping there.

Slides From Our April 19th Presentation

Thank you to all the great questions from the Suffield Historical Society members as well as honored guests from out of town. We’re planning to post documents from Hanchett’s trials with Exeter in similar slide format so that others can view the materials with us. Thank you for filling out the paper evaluations. Please click here to fill out the online version of the evaluation. http://tinyurl.com/hg9dcec

As we move forward and begin to boil down our research and refine our discoveries into coherent narrative, please feel free to comment on specific blog posts. And follow us on Twitter, especially the #CTUtold!

Is There a Connection Between the Chaffee family and John Hooker?

Hi, Loomis Chaffee:

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 8.39.26 AM

The Hezekiah Chaffee House at 108 Palisado Avenue, Image from “Images of America Windsor” by Windsor Historical Society

We are doing a project-base learning investigation on the Other Underground Railroad, we are also focusing on the UGRR in Connecticut. We found John Hooker had a vital role with Reverend Hemengway from Suffield in terms of creating a legal case in the 1840s to free the descendants of Flora, who was kidnaped and sold into slavery. During the research about the possible routes for runaway fugitives and traces of John Hooker, we discovered that the Chaffee House in Windsor was a possible stop for the fugitive slaves from the book “Places of the Underground Railroad: A Geographical Guide” by Tom Calarco. This information is also in Horatio Strother’s text, p. 171: https://archive.org/stream/undergroundrailr1962stro#page/170/mode/2up/search/chaffee

Because John Hooker is one key character, a major figure in the Connecticut abolitionist movement, we are trying to find out as much information about him and his relationship to this area, Windsor and Suffield. Did he have a connection to the Loomis family? If that is the case, we wonder how and why Hooker connected with Revenerend Hemenway in West Suffield. Can you please provide us some information about the relationship between the Chaffee (and perhaps Loomis) and John Hooker if possible? Is there anything in your archives that will shed light? John Hooker relates the the Flora Case in his memoir on pp. 31-33, https://archive.org/stream/somereminiscenc01hookgoog#page/n42/mode/2up/search/flora

Since the Chaffee House is also a possible and an important station in the runaway routine, we did further research on it to make sure the Chaffee family in our research is the same as the one who is related to your school. We found that the house was built for Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee around 1765. Dr. Chaffee’s daughter, Abigail, married Colonel James Loomis in 1805 and later they founded the co-educational Loomis Institute. The Chaffee House and the Loomis Institute then emerged to form the Loomis- Chaffee School in 1970, in which all the information about the Chaffee House matches with our research so far. Fortunately, the records relating to the slaves owned by Dr. Chaffee survive, including the documents for the emancipation of Elizabeth Stevenson. There’s another slave in the Chaffee household, Nancy Toney, who was later owned by Dr. Chaffee’s daughter, Abigail. When she died in 1857, she was the last surviving slave in Connecticut. With the evidence shown that there were slaves in the Chaffee House, we wonder if there is an any further information about who might have participated in the abolitionist activities in this area. Was anyone in the family involved in the abolitionist movement in any way?

Bests,

Coco SA 16’

 

 

Sources:

  1. “Historic Buildings of Connecticut.” Historic Buildings of Connecticut RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016.http://historicbuildingsct.com/?p=143
  1. http://www.windsorhistoricalsociety.org/nl_1998-01_pg5.html
  2. Calarco, Tom. “Places of the Underground Railroad.”Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.https://books.google.com/books?id=muBtFTkFH_EC&q=suffield#v=snippet&q=florence%20suffield&f=false
  3. Underground Railroad in Connecticut. https://archive.org/stream/undergroundrailr1962stro#page/170/mode/2up/search/chaffee

 

Grimke Sisters and their tour of New England

Angelina_Emily_GrimkeGrimke Sisters, just like their friend Lydia Maria Child, are also supporters for abolition of slavery and feminism, they are the first women to testify before a state legislature on the question of African American right. Their crusade, which was not only to free the enslaved but to end racial discrimination throughout the United States, made them more radical than many of the reformers who advocated an end to slavery but who could not envision true social and political equality for the freedmen and women.

Grimke Sisters hate the system of slavery since they are young, Unable to influence her family to free their slaves, Angelina joined her older sister Sarah in Philadelphia, where they became Quakers, and soon thereafter began to fight for emancipation.

Grimke Sisters are famous because they are known as the first woman to address a state legislature (Massachusetts in 1836), Angelina Grimke fearlessly traveled across New York and New England, speaking out against slavery at a time when women were scarcely seen and never heard in the public arena.

 

Resource:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelina_Grimk%C3%A9

https://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/slavery-and-anti-slavery/essays/angelina-and-sarah-grimke-abolitionist-sisters

http://www.womenhistoryblog.com/2013/10/angelina-grimke.html

http://www.iep.utm.edu/grimke/

https://books.google.com/books?id=ojNfgcwpb-gC&pg=PA161&lpg=PA161&dq=Grimke+Sisters+tour+of+New+England&source=bl&ots=dhNfiXnoSj&sig=d1hYzXzM_HP1se4bejqhw5AlL2g&hl=zh-TW&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjTkfnmiJ3LAhXB3SYKHX2pB7MQ6AEIRDAF#v=onepage&q=Grimke%20Sisters%20tour%20of%20New%20England&f=false