Tag Archives: George Washington

Bermuda Supporting the Colonies

As our 2017 Project Base Learning class has continued to look into 1774 regarding slavery and freedom in Suffield, Connecticut, we have been expanding to our search to the surrounding colonies and the Triangle Trade. The Triangle Trade was very crucial to the colonies economy. Slaves from Africa were sent to the West Indies to work on sugar plantations. This sugar was then transported up to the Colonies to be sold, and in return the Colonies traded food and supplies to the West Indies. The islands in the West Indies were populated with sugar plantations, and with this monopoly and wealth, they had enough money to pay whatever necessary funds for food and supplies. This allowed for the Colonies to charge high prices and enabled anyone to get in on the trade. I was curious of my hometown of Bermuda and where it fit into all of this during this era so, I started investigating our role in the trade.

I discovered Bermuda was not only apart of the triangle trade but also sympathized with the colonists idea of freedom. In the book “In the Eye of all Trade”, by Michael Jarvis, the details of Bermuda’s role in the trade is presented. Bermuda’s economy was dependent on trade by sea, and merchant ships from the Colonies and the West Indies. Being such a small island, Bermuda was not able to join the Colonies in their rebellion against the British, so instead they assisted the Colonies by selling them over a thousand Bermuda Sloops, which are very fast sailboats. However, along with the West Indies, when the revolution began, Bermuda worried of starvation as they relied heavily on imports of food from the Colonies. Likewise, the Colonies depended on Bermuda for salt, so Bermuda began exchanging salt for food. To further assist the Colonies, two Bermudians, Benjamin Franklin and Henry Tucker, robbed a hundred barrels of gunpowder to send to the Colonies.  As the Revolutionary War continued,

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Scan of letter from George Washington to Bermuda

Bermuda was still unable to join due to the power of the British Royal Navy. Nevertheless, George Washington wrote a letter to Bermuda addressing the topic of trade and Bermudas role in assisting the colonies. In his letter, Washington stated that if Bermuda continued to assist the Colonies in their fight for freedom, he would ensure that “your island may not only be supplied with provisions, but experience every mark of affection and friendship, which the grateful citizens of a free country can bestow on its bretheren and benefactors”.

The connection between Bermuda and the Colonies is clear and their support during the Revolutionary War was very beneficial in the fight for freedom. The small island of Bermuda played its own role in the rebellion and was a large part of the triangle trade.

http://www.bermuda.com/do-you-know-what-george-washington-promised-the-people-of-bermuda-in-1775/

https://allthingsliberty.com/2014/11/the-bermuda-powder-raids-of-1775/

Jarvis, Michael Joseph. “In the eye of all trade”: maritime revolution and the transformation of Bermudian society, 1612-1800. N.p.: n.p., 1998. Print.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Bermuda#Bermuda_and_the_American_War_of_Independence

http://www.bermuda-online.org/history1700-1799.htm

 

 

 

 

George Washington and His Effect in Suffield

Today in class we found an excerpt from the book called The Biography of a Town by Robert Hayden Alcorn. This book gives us a history of Suffield, Connecticut from 1670-1970. Towards the beginning of the book on page 80 there is a page that mentions when George Washington came to Suffield. This page speaks of both of his visits. In this excerpt

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Excerpt from  Alcorn’s The Biography of a Town

we find a piece from one of the townspeople’s diaries, which are what we use as our main primary source. In this piece Ebenezer Gay writes “George Washington came to town today. I took two pills and went to bed.” This implies  that some of the people were not very excited when George Washington came to town.
There is also another letter (primary source) that I found from Mary Austin (Seth Austin’s wife) who wrote to him in 1789 about the Austin Tavern receiving counterfeit money from a man named Jonas Mace, who apparently made a very good career by counterfeiting money. She wrote to him as if he could save them saying, “Necessity is my only apollogy for addressing a Gentleman of your dignified Merit—Having no alternative; you will excuse me…” In this letter she said her household and tavern had about 20 people living there, and they were very low on money so they were in much distress. I believe that these 20 people must have included more slaves that we previously thought they owned. Previously we found that they owned 5 slaves in a document that listed all the slaves owned in Suffield. Because of this I think that after the war the amount of slaves increased in Suffield and Connecticut by a large amount.

This webpage backs up the claim that George Washington had lunch at the Austin Tavern in 1775 when he was passing through on his way to take control of the Continental Army in Cambridge. This letter that Mary writes was written after the war.

Source: https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/05-03-02-0322