Tag Archives: Suffield Historical Society

History of Women’s Athletics

women

When searching the archives for information on women in sports at Suffield Academy, I came across a 1974 issue of The Bell. Dennis Kinne, the athletic director at the time, reached out to the female students, offering them opportunities to participate in male teams such as track & field and cross country.  This is very interesting, especially when comparing this historical moment to Suffield Academy’s athletics today. With women very integrated in our culture today, both athletically and academically. I am interested in finding out more about how women integrated into the athletic aspects of life at Suffield Academy. There must have been certain issues and challenges that Suffield Academy had to overcome involving athletic integration that would be very cool to discover and bring to light. Researching this topic will also bring to light the issues of gender equality present during the 1970’s, and I am very interested in comparing that to Suffield today. Another aspect of Suffield Academy’s history that I am interested in learning about is title IX and how it affected the athletics teams. Did Suffield lose any teams or gain any teams after title IX was enacted? This is an aspect I am hoping to learn about along with co-educational teams becoming competitive on campus.

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Women’s Sports in the 1970’s

At Suffield Academy, along with the majority of the United States, woman were not allowed to play in any major sports such as baseball, basketball or tennis due to the fact that they were considered “male sports”. In the early 1970’s, woman were again granted into Suffield Academy making it no longer an all-boys school. Soon later, woman were allowed to play in the same sports that men were, regardless of what the sport may be. In 1972, a civil rights act (Title IX or Title 9) allowed women to have equal opportunity in education along with playing the same sports as men do. An activist movement also resulted in colleges supplying equal funding for women’s sports as done for men’s. As an example of women excelling in sports due to this change; Billie Jean King was a female tennis player who received $10,000 for her victory in the U.S Open Final versus the male winner who won $25,000. The year after this, she faced a male player named Bobby Riggs for a prize of $100,000 and was victorious; this competition was not official but was simply for “bragging rights”. This was a huge step for women in sports as it portrayed the image that women can do what men do. Overall, Suffield Academy allowing women to partake in major sports so early on is quite remarkable as it took a long time for the entire country to follow along with this movement.

Driving Question: I would like to know, when were the women’s sports teams able to play against other schools in major sports? In other words, when did other schools change in the way Suffield did?

Required Skills: Analytical skills along with some statistical skills.

Image result for title 9
Image result for billie jean king battle of the sexes

https://www.biography.com/news/battle-of-the-sexes-true-story-facts

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/tix_dis.html

Lesbian Society Impact on Suffield

While I was searching the archives for articles that had significance to women history, I came upon this article about the Lesbian Society. I instantly grew interest and that night i went home and did further research on it. After doing a lot of research, I learned that the Lesbian Society was a very important group in Suffield. Even though the name of the group sounds like they had something to do with the LGBTQIA, they actually had nothing to do with it. They were a group that was formed to provide entertainment and relive during a time where the United States was fighting in World War I. I would like to research the Lesbian Society because i think that the Lesbian Society provided joy and calmness by providing dances, camps, festivals, and reception. This was not an easy time for Suffield as a lot of mothers were left alone to take care of the children and provide and times were only getting harder. The Lesbian Society was formed to make times easier for the ones who weren’t in the war and was at home fighting the homefront. What I would like to know is who were the key players in the Lesbian Society and how it was formed? I will need to search for more information about the Lesbian Society in our local archives. I can also check Suffield Academy’s archives, and I will reach out to members of the Suffield Historical Society and check records in the town hall.

The Lesbian Society is putting on a dance for the town of Suffield at Suffield Academy’s gymnasium. 

Sources
https://search.proquest.com/docview/556534008/EF821944C45C4808PQ/2?accountid=46995

https://search.proquest.com/docview/555593239/EF821944C45C4808PQ/3?accountid=46995

https://search.proquest.com/docview/555851477/EF821944C45C4808PQ/4?accountid=46995

Image:

https://search.proquest.com/docview/556659079/EF821944C45C4808PQ/1?accountid=46995

Suffield Academy Students Present at Suffield Historical Society Meeting on April 18th

Flickr_-_USCapitol_-_Boston_Tea_Party

Boston Tea Party Painting from US Capitol

What Happened in Suffield during 1774?

A free lecture from 7:00-8:00pm on April 18th at Suffield’s Senior Center, 145 Bridge Street. Suffield Academy Students will present about the complexities of 1774 during the Suffield Historical Society Meeting.

In response to the Boston Tea Party (1773), Parliament drafted the Coercive Acts in 1774, and residents throughout the thirteen colonies protested these acts in various ways. In the western town of Sheffield, Massachusetts, Colonel Ashley hosted citizens at his house, and that group composed the Sheffield Resolves. Interestingly, one of his slaves, Elizabeth Freeman, also known as Mum Bett, was inspired by these conversations of protest and later sued successfully for her own freedom.

What happened in Suffield during the pivotal year of 1774? What part of the population supported the growing patriot cause in Boston? What portion of citizens accepted the dictates of the British Parliament? Who was neutral? The year 1774 also marked the highest recorded number of slaves in Connecticut, 6,464. What effect did these turbulent times have on the 37 enslaved Africans in Suffield?

Suffield Academy’s American Studies class looks forward to sharing what they learned about the complexities of freedom and slavery in Suffield during 1774. All Society meetings are open to the public, and newcomers are most welcome. SA.Presentation.Flyer-4-18-2017